Archives for December 2013

What are the five areas you should be last and first in 2014?

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What are the five areas where you should be last and first in 2014? from Hugh Blane on Vimeo.

There are five areas where you should be the last person to do something. Here are the top five:

1. Be the last one to lose your composure:
When the yogurt is hitting the fan your values and priorities are on display. Always strive to keep your composure as your actions are a catalyst for others to follow.

2. Be the last one to lose your confidence:
Hope and optimism are essential for people to persevere and succeed. If you lose your confidence in people or projects people will start to give up.

3. Be the last want to lose your ability to care for clients, employees, and strategic partners:
If you don’t care for others it is a sure sign that it is step aside from leadership. People have become a transaction to you and in turn they would treat your customers as transactions.

4. Be the last one to lose your credibility:
People believe the messenger first and then the message. Always strive to do what you say you will do.

5. Be the last one to lose your candor:
People respect people who can tell the truth in a way that they can hear it. The key point here is “in a way others can hear it.”

There are also five areas where you should be the first person to do something. Here are the top five:

1. Be the first to admit you’re wrong or have made a mistake:
People trust and respect leaders who are willing to accept responsibility and accountability for their behavior. It prompts others to do the same.

2. Be the first to recognize complacency and mediocrity:
It’s too easy to breathe our own exhaust. Be on the look out pockets of performance that are stale and of low value. Be candid about your insights, the impact of your insights and the implications for you and your team.

3. Be the first to encourage others.
People always perform better when there is heartfelt encouragement. Performance increases when people are encouraged versus discouraged.

4. Be the first to role model the behavior you want to see:
People pay far more attention to what you do than what you say. If you want to see certain behaviors you know will benefit the team and organization, then you have to be the person to lead the charge.

5. Be the first to get crystal clear about your strategic direction and tactical priorities:
If you want to accelerate your performance you must be crystal clear about what you want and why. If you’re not clear people will stand by and wait for clarity. And waiting produces underperformance.

Of the ten areas I mentioned, on a scale of one to ten, with one being low and ten being high, how would you rate yourself on each area? Consider your strategic 2014 objectives and choose one to develop in the month of January. And after you’ve gotten good at the first of the ten areas tackle a second one.

As we welcome in 2014 I’d like to share this Irish blessing with you: May your saddest day of 2014 be no worse than the happiest day of 2013.

Thank you everyone for watching the Monday Morning Minute throughout the course of 2013. I hope you have a fabulous and Happy New Year!

Happy Holidays!

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Happy Holidays 2013 from Hugh Blane on Vimeo.

A costume or uniform. Which are you wearing?

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MMM 12-16-2013 from Hugh Blane on Vimeo.

Video Transcription:

Good morning everyone, my name is Hugh Blane and this is the Monday Morning Minute. This week I want to talk to you about costumes or uniforms.

When you think of costumes you may think of Halloween costumes or Elizabethan tights and a Midsummer Nights Dream. Uniforms are different though. They can create trust and respect as well as an Esprit de Corps. If a doctor or nurse walk into your hospital room you can feel comfortable that they are there. If you see a police officer wearing a uniform there is a sense of comfort that this can bring also.

Leaders wear uniforms they do not wear costumes. Uniforms are worn long term where costumes are worn for short periods of time. But leaders don’t have a physical uniform. The uniform they wear is a mental uniform.

If you want to have a more effective workweek there are three things you need to wear in order to be a more effective leader.

1. The first piece of mental clothing that leaders wear is the belief and recognition that leadership is not a solo activity. The only way to be truly effective is by engaging other people so that they are willing to follow your lead. Leadership is never a solo activity.

2. Leaders also wear the belief that if they cannot make a difference, if they cannot improve performance, they will make an exit. Being in a leadership position has as a requirement improving performance.

3. Leaders also wear the belief that their primary job is to make someone’s life easier. Whether it is a patient, an end-user, or a client. Someone‚Äôs life must be made easier and leaders know this and embrace it.

This is what leaders wear every day. It is a thought process-it is a mindset not a piece of clothing that leaders wear. If you want to have a more effective workweek, wear these three beliefs and you will be much more effective.

Thank you everyone. As always, I would love to hear your thoughts and my blog is the best place to do just that.

And also, if you know someone that would benefit from receiving the Monday Morning Minute, send it to them and let them know that they too can have the MMM in their inbox on Monday mornings.

I hope you have a fabulous week and I will see you here again next week. Take care.

Your Customer Is Not An ATM Machine

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Your Customer Is Not An ATM Machine from Hugh Blane on Vimeo.

You can find the Influence Process video I mentioned here.

The Leadership Paradox

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