Archives for June 2013

Monday Morning Minute 07-01-2013

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookGoogle+Share on LinkedInEmail to someone

Mario Andretti once said, “If everything feels like it’s under control you’re simply not going fast enough.”

Without any reservation, I believe you and 90% of the employees at every level of your organization are underperforming and capable of accomplishing far more than you are currently. I’m not trying to be unkind, but the limitations you experience walking the halls of corporate America are not concrete absolute limitations, but rather are self-imposed and artificial.

Yes, I know resources are limited and the clarion call to do more, do it better, and do it faster seems overwhelming and untenable. But, the type of thinking used by most executives and teams is focused on the lack of resources as opposed to being resourceful.

Why? Because in today’s hyper connected world of work executives and teams have become conditioned to believe that activity trumps value creation. They have become enamored with activity partially because they go from one task to the next and have no breathing room between meetings. I spoke with one client who told me they have on average ten meetings per day and sometimes as many as fifteen. This dramatically reduces the quality of their thinking and significantly impacts their ability to handle doing more, with less and faster.

If you want to perform in alignment with your full potential AND have a more effective week, I have eight suggestions for you:

1. Groom your calendar and jettison one LVPA meeting. LVPA is Low Value Producing Activity. You know the meeting I’m referring to. You can read more about effective meetings here.

2. Schedule time to be curious and explore how others accomplish what you deem to be extraordinary.

3. Inventory your self-talk. Notice what type of conversations you and your colleagues have. Are the conversations positive and empowering or the opposite? Learn to catch yourself when they are negative and replace your negative conversations with a positive alternative.

4. Spend time in meditation and or prayer. The most important time of your day is the first thirty minutes. Spend the first ten, fifteen or thirty minutes in meditation, prayer and or reading inspirational works and reconnect with who you are at your core.

5. Use affirmations and visualization extensively. Develop a list of qualities and traits you want to exemplify. Visualize accomplishing your list every morning before getting out of bed and every evening before turning the lights out.

6. Read widely in order to make broader connections.

7. Focus on how you would solve the problem rather than the difficulties of the problem.

8. Focus on being resourceful as opposed to a perceived lack of resources.

Which of the eight suggestion work best for you?

If you would like to increase your level of personal and professional effectiveness I offer several options of individual and team coaching. If you’d like to discuss them, feel free to reach out to me here.

Monday Morning Minute 06-24-2013

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookGoogle+Share on LinkedInEmail to someone

Monday Morning Minute 06-24-2013 from Hugh Blane on Vimeo.

Monday Morning Minute 06-17-2013

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookGoogle+Share on LinkedInEmail to someone

Monday Morning Minute 06-17-2013 from Hugh Blane on Vimeo.

My Nomadic Adventure

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookGoogle+Share on LinkedInEmail to someone

Nomads

Thornton Wilder said, “It’s when you’re safe at home that you wish you were having an adventure. When you’re having an adventure, you wish you were safe at home.”

Thornton Wilder’s insight into human nature cuts a little too close to home for me. You see, I will be nomadic over the next four weeks as a result of the remodeling of our house. Two different houses and three moves over the next four weeks leaves me feeling untethered, anxious, and yes, excited.

Untethered in that I won’t have a “home base” nor will I have my normal routines. I feel anxious about ensuring we’ve scheduled all our moves to closely coincide with our construction schedule, and excited to have a home that after being remodeled will have fewer walls and greater openness, an office that fits my work rather than my work having to fit my office, and twenty-four feet of glass doors and walls looking out on to Puget Sound.

I can do so because of the payoffs. But, how often do leaders in organizations ask people to change, give up what is comfortable and not provide any substantive benefits for doing so? Too often!

Do you have nomads wondering your halls?

Are you asking people to continually change?

Have you asked people to give up something comfortable and beneficial?

If you have, what is the payoff for them to do so?

If you want your team and or organization to be nimble, untethered by the status quo, and receptive to exploring new lands, you must paint a picture of the future that is so compelling that each member of your team will willingly become uncomfortable … and stay uncomfortable for an extended period of time.

Can you articulate an extraordinarily compelling reason why your employees should be willing to change and be uncomfortable? If you can I’d love to hear about how you did so on my blog.

If you can’t, then you will have to resign yourself to having employees travel to new and distant lands only to find them longing to return home.

Monday Morning Minute 06-10-2013

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookGoogle+Share on LinkedInEmail to someone

Monday Morning Minute 06-10-2013 from Hugh Blane on Vimeo.

Monday Morning Minute 06-03-2013

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookGoogle+Share on LinkedInEmail to someone

MMM 06-03-2013 from Hugh Blane on Vimeo.